Singapore Institute of Technology
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Texture improvement and in vitro digestion modulation of plant-based fishcake analogue by incorporating hydrocolloid blends

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posted on 2024-05-29, 06:55 authored by Felicia Zhi Wen Peh, Lin ZhaoLin Zhao, Yin Yin Chia, Kwoek Zhen NgKwoek Zhen Ng, Juan DuJuan Du

Hydrocolloids have proven effective in improving the texture of surimi gels, yet their application in plant-based seafood analogues remains underexplored. This study aimed to develop a hydrocolloid blend comprising methylcellulose (MC), curdlan gum (CG), and high-acyl gellan gum (GG) to achieve a surimi-like texture in plant-based fish cakes (PBFC) made from brown rice and pea protein isolates.

The research showcased that higher MC concentration boosted protein powder’s heated oil holding capacity, while CG concentration increments lowered it. However, heated water holding capacity remained stable despite changes in MC and GG levels. Incorporating hydrocolloids elevated PBFC moisture content, decreasing expressible moisture and oil amounts with rising MC, CG and GG concentrations. PBFC hardness increased with higher hydrocolloid levels and was influenced by temperature, while springiness remained unaffected. GG helped maintain storage modulus (G′) during PBFC cooling at higher concentrations, whereas the opposite effect was observed for MC. Analytically, higher MC concentrations reduced protein digestibility, while increased GG concentrations appeared to enhance it. Microstructural analysis corroborated these findings, with more protein aggregates in PBFC containing 3.8% MC and fewer in PBFCs with 6% CG and 3% GG. Consumer evaluations indicated that PBFC formulated with 1% MC, 3% CG, and 1.5% GG matched the springiness of commercial surimi-tofu fish cake, though it received slightly lower overall liking scores.

In conclusion, the combined use of these three hydrocolloids demonstrated the potential to enhance the physical properties of PBFC and modify protein digestibility, offering insights into the
development of innovative plant-based seafood analogues.

History

Journal/Conference/Book title

Current Research in Food Science

Publication date

2024-05-23

Version

  • Published

Corresponding author

du.juan@singaporetech.edu.sg

Project ID

  • 10490 (R-STR-A401-A007; R-STR-A401-A008) Automated Protein Profiling and Functional Characterization Platform
  • 7855 (R-STR-A401-A004) Modification of Brown Rice Protein Isolate Using Microbial Transglutaminases: Functional Property Enhancement and Nutritional Evaluation

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